Alec dc 2013 voter suppression-cropped280X291px.jpg Corporations actually vote with legislators on model bills?

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Policy

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Copyright Policy

ALEC Exposed considers contributions to this wiki to be released under the Creative Commons-Share Alike 3.0 License, unless otherwise noted.

Copyright Infringement Notification

If you believe there is content on the ALEC Exposed website that violates copyright law, please send us an email or letter that includes substantially the following:

A physical or electronic signature of a person authorized to act on behalf of the owner of an exclusive right that is allegedly infringed.

  • Identification of the copyrighted work claimed to have been infringed.
  • Identification of the material that is claimed to be infringing.
  • Information reasonably sufficient to permit the service provider to contact the complaining party, such as an address, telephone number, and, if available, an electronic mail address at which the complaining party may be contacted.
  • A statement that the complaining party has a good faith belief that use of the material in the manner complained of is not authorized by the copyright owner, its agent, or the law.
  • A statement that the information in the notification is accurate, and under penalty of perjury, that the complaining party is authorized to act on behalf of the owner of an exclusive right that is allegedly infringed.

The notice should be sent to our designated copyright agent, Lisa Graves, via email (lisa@prwatch.org) or fax (608-260-9714).

We may display a copy of your DMCA notice while your request is pending review and thereafter.

Note: Under Section 512(f) of the DMCA, any person who knowingly materially misrepresents that material or activity is infringing may be subject to liability for damages. One company that sent an infringement notification seeking removal of online materials that were protected by the fair use doctrine was ordered to pay such costs and attorneys fees under this provision. See http://www.eff.org/cases/online-policy-group-v-diebold. In addition, “in order for a copyright owner to proceed under the DMCA with “a good faith belief that use of the material in the manner complained of is not authorized by the copyright owner, its agent, or the law,” the owner must evaluate whether the material makes fair use of the copyright.” Lenz v. Universal, 572 F. Supp. 2d 1150, 1155 (2008).

The Center for Media and Democracy and its project ALEC Exposed reserves the right to review the allegedly infringing material and independently determine whether it is infringing.